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Update: Pineapple top roots

There were originally four - I threw the first one out... Mold.

There were originally four – I threw the first one out… Mold.

As the title of this post says: Just a quick update. I’ve noticed a lot of rooting progress with the pineapple tops that I have had sitting in water for eleven days now. The second one I started is doing a bit better than the others, but they’re all showing promise. There’s been very slight browning of the leaves, and there’s no sign of mold or decay anywhere. I haven’t had to change the water much (maybe once for each plant), because the water is staying pretty clear, and I’ve chose to leave well enough alone.

The most promising one so far

The most promising one so far

I don’t really have any decent pictures of the roots when they were first started off in water, but they were nothing like what you see here. The second one (#2) is showing the most progress so far, and I imagine that I’ll be transferring that one to soil in no time!

Third one. Promising as the rest! No rotting!

Third one. Promising as the rest! No rotting!

The third (#3 – noshit) one seems to be doing well also! The leaves are browning steadily, and there is semi-rapid root growth happening. It won’t be long before I’ll be transferring this one into soil… Maybe another 4-6 weeks, but we’ll see as I update you all on the progress.

#4 - The "baby" of the bunch. So far so good.

#4 – The “baby” of the bunch. So far so good.

Number four, which is the last one started in water, is starting to display life – the roots aren’t anywhere near as long as the others, but that’s because it was started later. I’m sure that there will be a lot of rooting on this one in the coming weeks. I can’t wait to see what’s going to happen between these three!

If you have any suggestions, now would be a great time to speak up! Comments are appreciated, and so are followers – I’m going to be posting at least 3x a week, so it’s worth it… Trust me!

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A few updates. That is all.

4a54057529c0cfda4ef9191b23af5a72-d3h0c3pHello, all – it’s been a few days since my last post, and it’s been a busy few days… Hence, no posts. In this post I’m going to offer up a few updates on projects already in the works that I have showed you so far since I started this blog. Enjoy.

This one shit the bed kind of early, but like stated in a previous post - the pineapple it came from looked kind of suspect in the first place.

This one shit the bed kind of early, but like stated in a previous post – the pineapple it came from looked kind of suspect in the first place.

I’d like to add that since my last post, I’ve started a new mango plant, and have thrown away one of the pineapple plants that I had rooting in water. The reason behind the tossing of the “potential” pineapple was that all of the leaves had dried out completely and were a shitty shade of brown, and there was mold forming in the middle of the leaves (where new leaves should have eventually grown from). If you look carefully at the picture, you’ll see the mold that I’m talking about – this prompted me to toss it in order to keep the others out of the way of any sort of risk. I didn’t want to chance it.

Avocado seed with first weeks worth of rootage! More sure to come!

Avocado seed with first weeks worth of rootage! More sure to come!

As for the avocado seeds, all seems to be great so far with those. The roots haven’t started growing out of either of the two that I showed you before,  but the very first one that I started that had already started sprouting it’s first root is well on it’s way to having a decent root system. I can tell from the little “buds” that are coming off either side of the root… I can see them when I look inside the exposed part of the seed carefully. Asstastic. Once the root system develops a bit, I’ll update you more on this little guy – and definitely on the other two mentioned before in my avocado post that you all loved so damn much. Seriously. Thank yous and such to the few that have liked, commented and followed so far. If it wasn’t for the few of you, I would have probably just bothered my Facebook friends with this particular brand of shit. But I can’t stand most of them anyway. And now I realize that the “publicize” feature dumps it on ’em anyway. Full of win. Okay – moving on…

These just might be white flies. If they are... Well fuck.

These just might be white flies. If they are… Well fuck.

The mango plants, however, have me a little concerned. As of yet, the choice to cover the newly potted seeds in plastic wrap hasn’t proven to be beneficial or detrimental  to the project so to speak, but when I looked at the plastic carefully today, I noticed tiny parasites of some sort stuck to the underside of the plastic… The tighter the plastic is wrapped, the more parasites. I’m thinking it may be a good idea to go ahead and let these seeds breathe while I go do some research…

Hopefully it's not serious.

Hopefully it’s not serious.

Since the last paragraph, I’ve done a tiny bit of research on the issue, and I’ve found that what we’re most likely looking at is White Flies. Shit… I hope this doesn’t ruin anything… I’m going to go crazy cleaning and disinfecting the apartment tonight. I’m going to also go ahead and keep the plastic off of these pots.

All three of them pretty much look like this in the middle.

All three of them pretty much look like this in the middle.

The rest of the pineapple tops that I’m rooting in water are doing great so far, but since my memory sucks, I have to take a lot of pictures to keep up with the progress on these. The leaves aren’t rapidly drying out, which is a great sign, and the roots look like they’re doing great. The very centers of the leaves are still sharp and pointy, and appear to be showing promise! I’m not going to bore you to stitches with photos of the other two, but I assure you – they all look pretty much like what you see here… healthy as I’d like ’em to be.. More on that sometime soon hopefully!

That’s it for the updates for now, I’ll be posting again very soon, and hopefully the word is all positive… I’m just remembering something as I’m going through some of my photos from last summer when I was all into photography and my allergies were awesome for me for whatever reason. I have a lot of photos of plant life from the outdoors. And like it or not, I’m going to share some of it with you from time to time. Like the one up top. Be sure to comment, like, follow… whatever – just show me some support, and I’ll show you my plants… That’s how it goes, right? See you soon.

An experiment in propagating avocado seeds – Part II

These avocados are of the Haas variety. They were purchased at the local Co-op.

These avocados are of the Haas variety. They were purchased at the local Co-op.

We left off on my last post with the completion of our homemade greenhouse. In this post, as promised, we’re actually going to go ahead and get these two avacado seeds started! Now for the sake of being completely honest, I’ve actually gone ahead and started the first one, which is the one that will stay uncovered… Hello – it’s the one you see here in the picture! We’re going to completely go over rooting the other avocado seed right now step-by-step using the experimentation method mentioned in part I of this post.

Haas variety avacado. Pretty tasty!

Haas variety avacado. Pretty tasty!

So the first thing that I did was to grab my homemade setup crafted from a soda bottle, then my avocado. The avocado being used here is a Haas variety, and I purchased it, and the other one a little earlier today from the local food Co-op. They only cost me $0.79 each!

Be careful at this stage!

Be careful at this stage!

Once I got my avacado in position, I grabbed a huge knife and threatened the hell out of it. I told it that if it didn’t yield me a beautiful plant, I would kill all of his cousins come spring… I don’t think it was paying much attention, though. I used the knife to cut the avocado vertically, lightly pressing until I could feel the seed against the blade of the knife. You want to make sure that while this is being done, you don’t damage the seed inside of the avocado. Once you feel the seed under the knife blade, go ahead and rock it all the way around lightly.

Twist... Simple

Twist… Simple

Once you make a vertical cut around the outer edge of the seed, go ahead and twist the two parts of the avocado apart. On a ripe avocado, they should come apart fairly easily. I tried this about two months ago with a really tough-fleshed avocado, and the seed was a true pain in the ass to remove… That seed actually sprouted it’s first root about two days ago in water – finally.

Fleshy seed.

Fleshy seed.

After I got the two halves separated, I was able to easily remove the seed from the half it was stuck in using only my thumb. When first removed, the seed tends to have a lot of the avocado flesh still on it, and you definitely want to get rid of it, being careful not to damage or remove the outer layer of skin on the seed – it’s brown, and it takes a lot of rubbing to get it off, so once again, no worries.

Clean avocado seed. Ready for the world!

Clean avocado seed. Ready for the world!

I removed the avocado flesh by running cool water over the seed and rubbing lightly – it comes off pretty easily. I made sure not to damage or remove the outer skin of the seed, which is light brown… You won’t have much success if you damage that outer skin, so be careful! I’m not sure what others do at this exact moment, but I let my seed dry out for a few minutes – it seems like it’s been through a lot, and I need to dry my hands and take some pictures anyway.

Three toothpicks will do the job.

Three toothpicks will do the job.

Now for the toothpicks. I make sure to keep the toothpicks that I’m using for this clean, as to not encourage the invasion of parasites. I try to be as clean as possible when dealing with anything that has to do with plants… It’s just a good idea. If you didn’t already know, I’ll inform you now – the roots will grow out of the bottom of the seed, which is the broad side – the flatter part of the seed. The plant itself will begin to stem from the top, or the pointy side of the seed, therefore you want to put the bottom of the seed in water, leaving the top of the avocado seed exposed to air.

Fill it just enough to cover the bottom half of the seed!

Fill it just enough to cover the bottom half of the seed!

Once you have the toothpicks in place in the seed, all that’s left to do is prop it up over the soda bottle greenhouse that we made earlier, fill it with water (enough to cover the bottom half of the seed), and cover it up with the top of the soda bottle. When you’re all done, your new project should look something like what I have pictured below.

Both avocado seeds... We'll see which grows better soon!

Both avocado seeds… We’ll see which grows better soon!

I’m going to keep these out of direct light. An ideal location for me would be in the kitchen, so that’s where they’ll be for now. As mentioned before, all feedback and comments are appreciated, and will keep me going as far as this blog is concerned. Subscribe if you’re benefiting in any way, and be sure to stay tuned – my next blog will be about propagating mango plants from seeds!

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